Blog Archive 2019


April 2019

Empowering Seniors: Who’s on your team?

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When I launched my business in early 2013, 97% of the people reaching out to me were being reactive to the aging process, not proactive. What does that mean? It’s like your life is a snow globe and someone is shaking it and when that’s happening, it’s hard to think clearly because you’re under a lot of stress. Years ago, when I was an admissions director, a woman came to me because her mom had just suffered a massive stroke and this poor daughter just sat there and dissolved to tears. Her snow globe was being shaken so hard she didn’t know which way was up and it broke my heart. It’s in situations like that where you’ll have wished you had a plan, that you had been proactive, so you or your children don’t have to be reactive to the situation, instead they can enact the plan that’s already in place.

That’s the goal here, to be proactive—to have a plan in place as you age. While some of this may seem like common sense, many people haven’t taken the steps to put a plan together.

Below is part of a “To Do” list I’ve shared in a blog before, but I wanted to break it down even further because it’s so important. Recently, I discussed this list and several other important topics at an educational seminar at the Westlake Porter Library. I’m hoping the following short videos from my presentation will help you tackle steps 1 and 2 of my proactive aging to do list!

Step 1: Attend Educational Seminars

Step 2: Surround Yourself with a Good Team


March 2019

Why do we research refrigerators and not an aging life plan?

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In the market for a new refrigerator? What’s the first thing you do? You head to the computer and start searching and searching and searching some more. As you begin to realize the number of options, you start to feel overwhelmed. How hard is it to find a refrigerator/freezer combo that keeps your food from spoiling, that’s all you want, right? Well did you take into consideration:

  • Do you want a French door style?

  • A side-by-side?

  • Bottom freezer?

  • Top freezer?

How about the color? Did you think about that?

  • Stainless steel?

  • Black stainless steel?

  • Black?

  • Black matte?

  • White?

  • Slate?

Are you going to have it delivered? Installed? You know, those are all extra fees!  

While you may feel overwhelmed, you’re in a good place. Your current refrigerator is still fully functional, and you have time to do this research and go into countless stores and look. But what if you don’t? We’ve all been there before. You come home from work and see that the refrigerator stopped working. Now you’re calling your neighbors or maybe your adult children to see if you can put what food didn’t rot into their freezer or refrigerator. Now it’s all hands-on deck as you ask your family and friends to clean up this mess in your kitchen while you and your spouse head to Best Buy, Home Depot or Lowes (whichever one is open past 7 on a Wednesday night) to find a new refrigerator ASAP.  

Now, what if instead of a refrigerator, it’s your health we’re talking about. Wouldn’t you want to take the time to research your options before something goes wrong and you’re forced to make a quick decision? Or have someone else make that decision for you? Asking your adult children or friends to help clean up rotted food is a lot easier than asking them to make crucial decisions about your health. Decisions that you could have had time to make and decide on. This is why it’s important to be proactive. To have a plan. To do the research and make an educated decision about your aging health.  

Take charge: Of your life, your health, your today and your tomorrow—because tomorrow always comes! Will you have plans or regrets?

Need advice and guidance on making these decisions? I will be speaking at the Westlake Porter Library (27333 Center Ridge Road, Westlake 44145 ) on April 4, 2019 at 7:00pm.  My topic is:  Empowering Seniors:  Steps to take to proactively plan for the aging process.  Contact Trina Thomas at 440 250-5466 to sign up or register here.


February 2019

February is the Month to Love Others and Yourself!

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Continuing with Seasons of Change mission of EMPOWERING SENIORS AND THEIR FAMILIES with education and encouragement to be proactive, I want to take this opportunity to encourage you to LOVE YOURSELF and those in your life by addressing your HEART HEALTH.    

February is upon us and is thought of as the month for lovers and for expressing our love.  The color we associate with February is RED and we symbolize February with  HEARTS.  Following that theme, February is designated as HEART HEALTH MONTH and on February 1st many of us wore RED to increase awareness of heart disease.  On February 14th, of course, Valentine’s Day, we celebrate our love for those special people in our life.  So while we are celebrating love and symbolic hearts let me take a quick minute to throw out some hard facts about your heart.  

Did you know that heart disease is the number one cause of death for women world- wide?  Sadly though, many women are not aware of this fact or educated to the symptoms that signal a heart attack.  The symptoms that women experience can be different from the “crushing chest pain” that is often associated when men experience a heart attack.  Although women can experience the crushing chest pain their symptoms are often much more subtle.  Those symptoms can include nausea, shortness of breath, pain in their neck, back, or jaw.  Often these symptoms are ignored by women.  

Data collected from studies show that even when women are aware of the high risk of mortality from a heart attack, fewer than half of these women see the high risk to themselves of developing heart disease or suffering from cardiovascular disease processes. According to the American Heart Association, an individual dies from cardiovascular disease every 38 seconds.  But, did you know that 80% of heart related deaths could be prevented? PREVENTION BEGINS WITH EDUCATION.  EDUCATION IS EMPOWERMENT. 

Please take the time to click on this link and view this humorous 3 minute educational video from the American Heart Association that covers the symptoms of heart attack.

We have loved Elizabeth Banks’s humorous acting chops in many movies and TV shows.  Here her portrayal of a woman having a heart attack, while causing us to chuckle, will strike a cord with many women.  While you are there, take the time to look around the site and thoroughly educate yourself to the symptoms of cardiovascular disease and prevention strategies.   

“I DON’T HAVE TIME TO EDUCATE MYSELF, IT WILL NEVER HAPPEN TO ME”, you may be thinking.  To that comment I would wonder if you have any idea how much time it takes to recover from a heart attack?   Hospitalization, cardiac rehab, follow up physician appointments, time missed from work, using all your PTO time with recovery.  Trust me when I say that it will take far less time to educate yourself to the risks, warning signs and strategies to live a healthier life.  You will thank yourself and your loved ones will thank you!  

For even more information on heart health LOVE YOURSELF and visit:

 Can we live better?

 Go Red for Women

January 2019

Three Tips to Maintain Self-Care as a Caregiver

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How much time do you spend doing things for yourself? That could be reading a book, watching your favorite TV show, getting a manicure, etc. When was the last time you did something for yourself?

Being a caregiver is a difficult, time consuming and often stressful job. Each day seems to bring with it new highs and lows, and sometimes, progress and regress. As a former caregiver, I understand this roller coaster. For over a year, I was a caregiver, alongside my mom, for my 87 year old grandfather. We cooked for him, did his laundry, helped with his medications, helped with household tasks and basically anything and everything he needed, no matter how big or small. Days blurred one into the next with the same routine of school, work and caregiving. My grandfather lived next door to us so the only way to totally get away from caregiving was to leave the house, and feel terribly guilty in the process.

We would be on the go for what seemed like 20 hours a day with no downtime. The minute there was the opportunity for down time, we found something else that needed to be done whether at our house or my grandfather’s house. We were constantly burned out and stressed, feelings that are not helpful for anyone. After he passed away in February of 2018, my mom and I began to realize just how long of a year it had been. We realized how much we didn’t do for ourselves.

With that in mind, I am challenging you to be proactive with your self-care in 2019. Don’t wait for life to get out of hand to try to implement self-care practices. For the New Year, I’m personally challenging you, as a caregiver, to make time for your self-care. As you embark on this self-care journey, keep these tips in mind:

1.Self-Care is not Selfish

It’s so easy to feel that even 5 minutes of down time is selfish because there’s always more than can be done. Don’t let that little voice in your head convince you of that. Instead, change your perspective. We’ve all heard the phrase, “you can’t pour from an empty vessel.” You need time to relax and rejuvenate because caregiving is so draining. Ask yourself, “How can I provide the best care for my aging loved one when I’m running on empty?” The answer is, you can’t. You need to be at your best before you can do the best for someone else.

2. There’s only so much you can do.

You are not faster than a speeding bullet. You are not superman or superwoman. You have limits and running constantly on little sleep while being filled with stress is not a good combination. In fact, I think the real superheroes are the ones who know their limits and when to say no to others in order to say yes to themselves. As a caregiver, you may be faced with tasks that you can’t do for your aging loved one. Know your limits and when to call in for help, whether from another relative or from a professional

3. Be intentional with your self-care.

Set goals for your self-care like you would for work. Set a goal to go to bed at a certain time or make sure to eat breakfast. It may be silly but take time to watch your favorite TV show or read another chapter in the book you’ve been trying to finish. Being intentional about your self-care and making time for those little things will make a huge difference in your overall health and outlook.

Be proactive in 2019 with your self-care. Start with good habits and intentional activities before you’re burned out and trying to fit in self-care time.

For more tips on self-care as a caregiver, visit the Family Caregiver Alliance National Center on Caregiving.

January's blog written by guest author, Sabrina Plumb, Communications Coordinator.